Dennis L Hitzeman's world of science and technology
 
 

July

Posted at July 17, 2015 by

2015-07-17 15.09.08If you’re at all like me, you have a lot of old technology lying about. One of the most common forms of that old tech is in the form of old cellphones, which means for me, smartphones. One of the solutions I have employed for upcycling these phones is to use them as streaming media jukeboxes. For newer phones, this solution requires nothing more than a factory reset.

UPDATE: In the five hours since I originally posted this, I have since swapped the Galaxy Note 2 for an old Droid 2 Global that does just as well and has a desktop dock, freeing the Note 2 for other projects. /UPDATE

Originally, I had an old Samsung Galaxy Note 2 (affiliate) plugged in by the audio jack to a Lepal LP-2020A+ Digital Audio Amplifier (affiliate) driving a Dayton Audio B652 6-1/2-Inch 2-Way Bookshelf Speaker Pair (affiliate). Since then, I have swapped the Note 2 out for a Droid 2 doing the same work.

I reset the phone to its factory settings then installed the various music services I use (Pandora, Google, Amazon). Now, I have a dedicated music device separate from my PC.

Do you have other uses for old smartphones? Mention them in the comments.

DLH

 
 

July

Posted at July 8, 2015 by

If you read the kinds of news feeds and websites I do, you can’t help but have come away with the breathless, panicky sense that the cyber world is collapsing in on itself as the result of what has been, so far, three unrelated technical glitches involving United Airlines, the New York Stock Exchange, and the Wall Street Journal.

While it may yet prove that some or all of these were attacks and that those attacks may have somehow been linked, it’s important to remember that nearly all of the rest of the unimaginable amalgam we call the internet is still working just fine. Attempts to label the glitches that have occurred miss the point that, even with the most widespread attacks that have so far occurred, most of the internet kept right on as it always had.

That’s not to say we shouldn’t all be vigilant, because we should, or that we should accept the explanations the various victims have put out that these aren’t attacks, because half the time they don’t even know they’ve been attacked until someone else points out they have, but rather to say that attacks on the internet are more like two armies trying to play capture the flag in a dismal swamp than cyber-themed nuclear holocaust.

It may yet turn out these were attacks, and the attacks may yet get worse, but more than likely, even if they do, it won’t be the end of things, and if it turns out to be, there will be no doubt it is.

DLH

 
 
 
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